A Simple Meatless Monday Meal – Salmon, Delicata Squash, and Cabbage

This meal is really simple, but easy and delicious enough to start the week off right. I just happened to decide to pair these 3 things (salmon, squash, and cabbage) together, but you can mix and match these with almost anything. For example, you could use chicken or steak instead of fish. You could also even use the cabbage or squash in some sort of Buddha Bowl with a grain.

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Salmon

This was a piece of Norwegian salmon that I grabbed at the local grocery store. There was nothing to this prep – just some salt, pepper, garlic powder, and a little fresh parsley on top. If you don’t have fresh herbs, use dried herbs or skip the herbs all together! It is still delicious simply seasoned.

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I air fried the fish, as I normally do. (I find the cleanup with this method a bit easier, but feel free to cook in the oven or stove top.) We usually have one larger piece that we split into two portions. This gives me the perfect opportunity to cut it down the middle with my spatula after cooking a while to check for doneness. It should begin the flake easily with a fork. Also, this salmon had the skin on, but once the salmon is cooked, I can usually lift the salmon apart from the skin without much difficulty. I just make sure the wedge the spatula carefully between the fish meat and the skin. If you usually cook fish, this may be known territory!

Cabbage

This is the way my mom used to make cabbage when I was growing up. It’s as easy as it can get. Jake really likes it and sometimes requests it. I just slice some carrot with a knife. If you don’t want to do this by hand, just buy already-sliced carrots or use the slicer attachment on a food processor. I also then slice some cabbage. In fact, I think a lot of grocery stores sell a “cole slaw” mix with exactly what you need. In a pan on the stove, I add a little oil, the cabbage and carrots, and some salt and pepper to taste. I then sauté it on medium heat until tender.

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Delicata Squash

I got so excited this past weekend when delicata squash was back at the grocery store. To prepare this, I cut off the ends and sliced it in half the long way. I scooped out the seeds from each half and then cut in approximately 1/2″ semi-circle slices. Because the squash is a bit lighter and sweeter in flavor (in my opinion), I like to play up the sweet and savory. I toss the slices in a little olive oil, salt, pepper, a drizzle of maple syrup, and a dash of cinnamon powder.

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I ended up air frying the squash until tender, but in the past, I’ve also baked it in the oven.  If baking, I’d set the oven to  375 degrees Fahrenheit and bake for about 15 minutes, flipping about half way through. Every oven is different, so just adjust as needed. Poke it with a fork part way through. If it’s tender, then it’s done.

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These are some great ideas and are easy enough that you can do them any day of the week!

Sincerely,
Fu’d

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Tofu In A Honey Soy Sauce

I’ve had a container of tofu in my fridge for a few weeks now and we finally decided to use it last night. If you don’t normally like tofu, this might change your mind.

We were staying in for a cozy Friday night and didn’t want to binge out with totally unhealthy food. (Although, I cant lie, we really wanted pizza or Chinese takeout.) We usually don’t do much with the tofu – either stir fry it with other vegetables, use it in a fried rice, or we’ve also made tofu fries a couple times. This time I found a recipe for a honey soy tofu. The recipe had directions for making a really simple sticky sauce with soy sauce, honey, ginger, garlic, pepper, and Chinese five spice. (Here’s the link to the recipe.)

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I had forgotten, but the tofu that I bought was already cubed. That was a win in terms of effort, but I think when I make this again, I’d prefer to buy the block of tofu and cut it myself. The only reason is that the already-cubed tofu is a little small. Bigger cubes would make it a bit easier to eat and probably make for a better ratio of sauce to each piece of tofu. (Sounds so scientific, doesn’t it?)

The recipe calls for crisping up the tofu on the stove. I have never found cooking it on the stove or baking it in the oven to be easy or effective to get that “fried” look or consistency. The only thing that works for me is the air fryer. So, that’s what I used. I didn’t bother using any seasoning at all because I knew I’d already have plenty of flavor from the sauce it was going to be tossed in.

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In the meantime, I prepped the sauce per the recipe. The only difference is since I wasn’t cooking the tofu on the stove, I prepared and mixed the sauce right into the sauce pan (versus a separate container). Once the tofu was done, I put it in the sauce and turned the stove on to medium. Cooking down the sauce didn’t take long at all – really only five minutes or so until it became a more sticky consistency.

On the side, I made a few things:

First, I made kale chips. So simple. Just tear the kale leaves into smaller pieces, place on a baking sheet so they don’t overlap with each other, spray with some olive oil spray and sprinkle with salt. I baked these in the oven at 375 degrees Fahrenheit for about ten minutes.

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Second, I was also really excited because I can never usually find already-cooked polenta that is in the tube shape. Jake and I stumbled into a new store yesterday while picking up Whiskey (one of our dogs) from the vet. There it was! So, I grabbed the polenta, sliced up about half of the tube into 1/2″ rounds and air fried until there was a little golden color on top. I think next time I’ll try lightly frying these on the stove so I can get the golden brown color without overcooking the insides and drying it out.

Third, I air fried some mushrooms, just seasoned with some salt, pepper, and paprika. Lastly,  I cut up some ripe avocado that we had on hand.

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Can you tell which one below is mine? Hint: Did I mention that I eat everything with either Sriracha or Frank’s Red Hot? (Haha – I love the spiciness!)

Overall, this was a great weeknight dinner that keeps it healthy and interesting! You could certainly mix up the grain and use farro, brown rice, or quinoa. The vegetables could be spinach, broccoli, etc. These “buddha” bowls are so versatile!

Happy weekend!

Sincerely,
Fu’d

Vegetarian Cottage Pie – Set It & Forget It

I really love cottage and shepherd’s pie. I can practically eat an entire casserole dish of it on my own, and all in one sitting. If you’re wondering what the difference is between cottage and shepherd’s pie, you’re not alone. Before someone recently brought it to my attention, I thought I had been making shepherd’s pie all these years. However, shepherd’s pie is traditionally made with lamb and cottage pie includes other meats, typically beef.

The way I made this a couple days ago is seriously the new way to cook one of these pies. In this case, I used a vegetarian ground beef. Because of this, I was able to eliminate pre-cooking the meat and I cooked everything in one step in my InstaPot pressure cooker. However, given the many talents of the pressure cooker, I imagine you could get away without pre-cooking real ground meat, too. (I just haven’t tried it. If you do try it, make sure the pressure cooker is set to cook long enough to fully cook the ground meat.)

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Here are the ingredients I used for the “meat” mixture:

  • 1 carrot (medium diced)
  • 1 small onion (chopped)
  • A couple of sliced mushrooms
  • 3/4 cup frozen peas
  • Corn kernels from one ear of corn
  • 12 oz package of vegetarian ground beef
  • 2 Tbsp cup water
  • Salt and pepper (to taste)

Here are the ingredients I used for the mashed potatoes. Increase the amounts if you like or want more mashed potatoes on top than a thin layer.

  • 5 small potatoes (cubed)
  • 1 pat butter
  • 2 Tbsp almond milk (any kind of milk you prefer for mashed potatoes is fine)
  • Sour cream (optional)
  • Salt, pepper, garlic powder, freeze dried chives (to taste)

I stirred all the “meat” mixture ingredients (except the water) together in the InstaPot. I decided to add a tiny bit of salt and pepper. The vegetarian beef I got seemed to already be seasoned, so I didn’t want to be too heavy handed. I sprinkled the water over the top. The water was to add some moisture to the pressure cooker while everything cooked. I patted the mixture down at the bottom to compact it a bit. I left it relatively flat on top, but made a little divot in the center. I’ll tell you why in a moment.

Next, I got a piece of tin foil and made it into a semi-bowl. I placed this in that divot. This was so the sides of the bowl would stay somewhat in tact during cooking and not allow any of the liquid for the mashed potatoes drip out the sides. In the tin foil bowl, I added all the mashed potato ingredients. I didn’t even bother mixing it up.

I put the lid on the pressure cooker and set it to “Bean/Chili” at normal pressure for 25 minutes. If you’re using a veggie beef like me, you could probably get away with 15-20 minutes. If anything, the potatoes would take the longest to cook and that should still be plenty of time.

Once the cooking was done, I did a quick release of the pressure and opened the lid. At this point, the potatoes should be fully cooked through. I dumped the potatoes from the tin foil directly on top of the “meat” mixture. I smashed it right on top and flattened/spread it across. I opted sprinkled some Parmesan cheese on top.

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I also found that the amounts of liquid I originally used made it a little more watery than I’d like, so I set the InstaPot to saute and let some of the extra liquid boil away. This made some of the juice boil up to the top, which I didn’t mind. It gave it a nice rustic/hearty look and brings some of that flavor to the top. Plus, it only took a few minutes and it was literally zero effort.

Finally, the cottage pie was served. We had extra avocado we needed to use, so we added that and a dollop of sour cream.

This is the first time I’ve made this dish in this way, so there is surely some room for improvement. At the very least, I hope this gives you some ideas on how to make your dinner prep and cooking more efficient and still delicious!

Sincerely,
Fu’d

A Versatile Red Onion Marmalade

We went to BJ’s Wholesale Club Labor Day weekend to pick up a rack of ribs for smoking. While we were there, I decided to pick up some red onion to add to a quinoa salad. Of course, we were forced to buy the 3 lb bag of red onions, when all I really needed was one. So, we used a few red onions here and there the past few weeks, but we still had quite a bit left. I originally thought I would make pickled red onions with the left overs because I love anything pickled. But as I was searching Pinterest, I came across a red onion marmalade recipe. (Here’s the link to the recipe.) I decided to make this because it looked more versatile – I could potentially use the marmalade to complement more types of dishes.

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At first, I thought it look very much like caramelized onion, but it truly is more like a marmalade – much sweeter and stickier than caramelized onion. That threw me off at first; I thought maybe I used too much brown sugar or butter, but it’s meant to be that way. In the end, I think I may have still reduced the sugar and butter by just a little bit or added more red onion to suit my taste buds.

Overall, this was really simple and I followed the recipe pretty closely. I sliced the onion, melted the butter, mixed in the onion, and then mixed in the brown sugar.

 

I left the stove on medium/low heat just so the mixture was constantly on a “low bubble”.  It took about 30 minutes for me to cook this down until the onions were tender and dark and the mixture was super sticky (not a lot left to reduce down). I then added the red wine vinegar a little bit at a time, cooked it down, then added more, etc. until the red wine vinegar was used up. This took about another 10 minutes.

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Approximately 5 minutes into cooking
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Near the end of cooking

We had some steak in the refrigerator that needed to be eaten that night, so Jake fired up the grill and we enjoyed the marmalade as a topping. Jake really liked it, I think particularly because he has a sweet tooth. I have to admit, it did pair nicely with the savory steak. On the side, we had air fried kale and mushrooms. I also made roasted potatoes with garlic and green onion.

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I think this might also go really well with the traditional piece of toast or can even be used as part of a marinade, incorporated into salad dressing, or used as a puff pastry appetizer topping! Yum!

I hope to see some comments about successful marmalades you’ve made and what you like to eat them with!

Sincerely,
Fu’d