Sharpen Your Mind, Sharpen Your Knives – My Calphalon Set

There’s always so much emphasis around making sure you have sharp knives. Otherwise, you tend to put more force behind your cuts and are more likely to cut yourself. I’ve purchased knife sets in the past, but that was really before I had grown interested in cooking. My primary goal at the time was to just get a good deal. And similar to the pots and pans that Jake and I had when we moved in together, we also had a mixed bag of cutlery. As we began to cook more, we decided one Christmas not to buy each other gifts, but instead to buy a joint gift for ourselves. That gift was the 20-piece Self Sharpening Calphalon Cutlery Set. We bought it online at Macy’s. We may have waited until there was some sort of holiday deal or used a coupon. (Here’s the link to the set we bought.)

TL; DR – This is a nice knife set and I would recommend it. There are a couple of flaws, just like any knife set has. If you’re interested in learning more, read on…

This set has been really good so far. The assortment of knives and other cutlery has been great. Here’s the list of what’s included in the set, taken directly from the link above.

  • 4.5″ paring knife
  • 5″ boning knife
  • 5″ santoku knife
  • 5.5″ tomato knife
  • 6″ fork
  • 6″ utility knife
  • 7″ santoku knife
  • 8″ bread knife
  • 8″ chef’s knife
  • 8″ slicing knife
  • 8 steak knives
  • Knife block with built-in ceramic sharpeners
  • Kitchen shears

Pros

I find that for most day-to-day use, I use the 5″ santoku knife (top knife in photo below). It is the perfect size for cutting most produce. The 7″ santoku knife is great for cutting larger items; I’ve used it to cut acorn squash, spaghetti squash, watermelon, etc. (second knife in photo below). This may sound silly, but I really like using the 6″ fork when we have guests over and we are serving sliced meat. It makes me feel fancy (third piece in the photo below). Lately with all the fresh garden tomatoes that have been given to us this summer, I have used the tomato/bagel knife quite a bit, as well. It is a small serrated knife (fourth knife in the photo below.) We also use the steak knives quite often.

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From top left to bottom right: 5″ santoku, 7″ santoku, 6″ fork, 5.5″ tomato knife

I use the other knives on an as needed basis or if the knives I normally use are dirty and I’m feeling too lazy to clean them. The only thing that I feel is missing in the set is a filet knife. I’ve substituted with the 5″ boning knife in some of the cases I felt I needed a filet knife.

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5″ boning knife

The knives feel really well-made and haven’t really tarnished in the couple of years we’ve had them. Some of my old sets get a little rust over time. Nobody wants that served with their meal.

Cons

Frequency of Use

As I mentioned up above, there’s no “perfect” knife set in my opinion. They’re all going to have a flaw, mostly because people have different needs and uses, so it’s hard to get it exactly right for everyone. Here are the couple of things I’ve noticed with my set:

The flaw with the self-sharpening, for me personally, is that the knives we use frequently hardly ever make it back to the block before we need it again. For example, I use the santoku, wash it, put it on the drying rack. Then, the next night, I need to use it again. On the flip side, the knives that we don’t use often don’t get taken out of the block often, so they rarely see the benefit of the sharpening.

I suppose that sharpening every once in a while is better than never doing it. It also takes away some hassle of pulling out a sharpening block if it is something that you do normally. Lastly, if you’re a victim to the “frequency of use” challenge I described above and really need to sharpen your knife, just move it back and forth a few times in the block.

Knife Block

The other flaw in the knife block design is that the serrated knives don’t have the metal shield around the opening. That means if you miss the slot, you ding the wooden block. Below you’ll see a photo of the entire set – you can see the metal plate at the top for the non-serrated knives. This works great. 20180916_133136

Metal plate for the non-serrated knives

On the other hand, below, you can see the hole where the scissors usually go and the steak knives above it.

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Scratches on the wooden block where there is no metal plate

Overall, I really like this knife set. It’s sturdy and it helps me feel like I’m “adulting”. I don’t regret paying a few hundred dollars for it because we’ll likely have it for a long time. Plus, I’m not sure there’s really that much better out there in an affordable price range.

Hope this helps anyone looking for a new knife set!

Sincerely,
Fu’d

Leftover Lo Mein Pseudo-Arancini

Yep, you read that right. This was a total experiment. Jake and I had leftover shrimp lo mein from our favorite local Chinese food joint. We had about three quarters of the large container left and I didn’t want it to go to waste.

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Leftover lo mein

The problem was that I didn’t feel right eating lo mein on a Monday night. To me, it seems like a pig out junk food. And since my diets always start on a Monday ;), I felt like I needed to mask it somehow. I decided to pulse it in the food processor, which essentially riced it, and then make it into an air-fried ball. I call it pseudo-arancini because arancini is traditionally made with rice. I’ve actually never made arancini before, but I figured this might be unique and potentially yummy.

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After pulsing the lo mein in a food processor

I mixed in two eggs and and about 1/3 cup panko breadcrums. I chose panko because I didn’t want to add in too many other flavors to the already-flavored lo mein. I initially started with one egg and approx. 1/4 cup of breadcrumbs. I then added the second egg and additional breadcrumbs because the consistency wasn’t sticky enough for a ball to hold together.

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Mixing the riced lo mein with egg and panko
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Egg and panko incorporated to make a sticky mixture

I was trying to decide what should go in the middle of the lo mein ball. From what I’ve read, traditional arancini usually has some sort of cheese, meat, and/or peas. I didnt think that cheese fit in this case and I wasnt feeling the meat or peas. I decided to go with mini frozen chicken and vegetable dumplings I had in the freezer. They are only about 1.5 inches wide, so the size worked out well. I microwaved them first so they weren’t frozen and used one in the center of each ball.

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Mini dumplings from BJ’s Wholesale Club, used as the filling for the balls

I then simply formed a ball of lo mein around the dumpling. (Be prepared to get messy hands.) I started first by taking a bit, compacting it and flattening it. I then placed the dumpling in the middle and started to cup my hand so the lo mein would begin to wrap around the edges. I took another scoop of lo mein with my other hand, put it on top of the dumpling and just began shaping it. I kept compressing it and rolling it with both cupped hands until a ball shape was formed.

When satisifed with the shape, I rolled the ball in some more panko bread crumbs. Finally, I refrigerated the balls for about 30-45 minutes so they would firm up a bit.

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Rolling the shaped balls in panko

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I think deep frying them would’ve been delicious, but I wasn’t ready to put that much effort into it. So, I went with the healthier and easier option – my air fryer. I set it to 400 degrees Farenheit and turned them every so often until they were a golden brown all around. This took a total of about 20 minutes.

The end result was a fun, new dish. I was surprised that the very flavorful lo mein didn’t seem to present itself much when cooked in the ball. Maybe the breadcrumbs and egg dulled a bit of the flavor. If I make this again, I would incorporate some extra seasoning – perhaps some sriracha, a splash of soy sauce, scallion, or something that might make the flavors pop a little more. I made a mayo/ketchup/sriracha dipping sauce and served it with a side of air fried broccoli.

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Out of the air fryer and onto the broccoli
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Ball cut in half, showing the mini dumpling

Jake thought the dish was very heavy, so if you’re looking for something light, this probably isn’t it. On the other hand, if you are looking for something to do with your leftovers and don’t mind a little experimentation, I’d say give it a try! I would love to see you try this and comment with your experience!

Hope this inspires you to try something new!

Sincerely,
Fu’d

Oui Oui, French Bread & Shrimp Scampi

Jake’s dad makes a lot of really scrumptious seafood dishes. One of those dishes is his famous shrimp scampi that I have only heard whispers about, but had not actually witnessed or tried myself. Last night put an end to all those rumors! Jake’s parents came over and not only made that famous shrimp scampi for us, but also taught us how to make it. Warning: I’m not at liberty to divulge all the details, but I will talk about some of its ingredients and leave you drooling with some photos. In honor of the shrimp scampi, I also put my new stand mixer to use again and made a fresh loaf of french bread.

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The surprising and not-so-surprising thing about the shrimp scampi recipe is that it is very simple – not a lot of ingredients. It is primarily comprised of clam juice, butter, clams, and garlic. Seasonings and other flavorings seem like they could be up to you. You could even add a little at a time, taste test, adjust, and repeat until you’re happy with the flavors. In my opinion, any of the following could add some nice flavors: salt, pepper, scallions, shallots, basil, parsley, red pepper flakes, a squirt of lemon, or splash of white wine or white cooking wine. You’ll obviously need shrimp to make it shrimp scampi, but you can feel free to add whatever other seafood you like. In this case, we had shrimp, scallops, and lobster – the trifecta. A flaky white fish or muscles would also complement this dish well.

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Lobster is prepped and ready to add into the sauce
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Sauce being cooked on the stove

We enjoyed the sauce with some linguini. I almost offered to make fresh pasta with my new stand mixer pasta attachments. But since I’m still a novice at that, I didn’t want to mess up the dish or the cooking lesson. Next time, it will definitely be worth a try.

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Whenever you have a pasta dish in front of you, it is a requirement that you have some bread to sop up that extra sauce. So, here comes the french bread. As usual, I used handy dandy Pinterest to find an easy recipe. (Here’s the link to the recipe.) The actual work to make the bread isn’t difficult, but I had no idea how time consuming the entire process is. If I ever make bread again, I would not make a single loaf. If I’m going to spend an entire day waiting for the dough to rise, I would probably make a few loaves.

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In this recipe (and I think most bread recipes like this), you need to let the dough rise for an hour, then punch it down, let it rise for another 30 min, then shape the loaf, and let it rise for another 30-60 minutes. I chose to brush the loaf with an egg white wash before baking. However, it seemed a bit dry, so I decided to additionally brush it with butter and some dried rosemary near the end of the baking time and after it was done and out of the oven. Wow, the aroma from the butter and rosemary was SO good. Also, about halfway through the baking, the bottom of the bread was browning a lot faster than the rest. Since the bread was firm enough at that time, I put it on a baking rack, which sat on top of the baking sheet.

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The bread had a nice flavor, but it was a bit dense. I had to do a little research afterward to see what it would take to get a fluffier inside. I suspect I didn’t knead the dough for long enough. Also, I might experiment with the different flours that I use. Also, the “jelly roll” method that was used to make the loaf left noticeable spirals inside when slicing the bread. I wonder if I just need to either roll it tighter or maybe next time I’ll just shape the loaf without flattening first and rolling.

To finish it off, Jake’s mom had brought cupcakes for us to enjoy for dessert. We were already so full from the pasta that having an individual-sized dessert hit the spot.

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All in all, it was a great dish to mark the end of summer. Even Whiskey and Brody (our pups) wanted to try some. I can’t wait to try the recipe and hopefully perfect it!

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Sincerely
Fu’d

Pasta Infused With Tomato Puree and Basil

After debating for a year about purchasing a stand mixer, I recently went ahead and did it. The first attachments I really wanted were the pasta attachments, which Jake got me for my birthday last week! The set comes with a roller and a cutter for fettuccine and another for spaghetti.

I decided to put it to use last night. I knew I wanted to do an infused pasta, but I didn’t have any fresh herbs on hand and I was feeling too lazy to head to the store. I promptly searched Pinterest to see if there was anything I could do with the ingredients in my fridge. We still had four fresh tomatoes that Jake’s parents had given to us and I was delighted to find a pasta dough recipe that called for tomato sauce and dried basil. (Here’s the link to the recipe.)

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Instead of using tomato sauce, I made a tomato puree from three of the tomatoes we had on hand. I cut the tomatoes into large pieces (I got four slices out of each tomato) and scooped out all the guts. I didn’t de-skin the tomatoes, just tore off pieces of skin where it was a little rougher. I then boiled the tomatoes in water until they were soft, drained them, and tossed the tomatoes into the food processor until pureed.

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I followed the pasta recipe, although I ended up tripling it because the serving size in the recipe seemed small. I think I could’ve gotten away with doubling it because I ended up with some leftovers. Jake and I eat generously, so that may give you an idea of how much you need.  The recipe called for optional vegetable oil and an optional egg. For the tripled recipe, I ended up using about 2 tablespoons of oil and 2 eggs. I would suggest that you fully mix or let the stand mixer fully mix the dough before deciding if you need to add in more tomato puree. At first, it would seem dry, so I would put in a tiny amount more of the tomato puree. Then, it seemed too wet, so I added a little flour to balance it out. In the end, I think I could’ve just stuck with the original proportions.

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I used the fettuccine cutter because I like the slightly thicker noodles. I also went with the 7 setting on the cutter for thickness. Next time, I think I’ll try going down to a 6. Because I made extra dough, I ended up with 6 batches. (I followed the guidance of using approximately 4 ounces of dough for each batch. Picture below of what ~4 oz looks like. I have petite hands.)

I was stumped as to what kind of sauce I should use with the pasta. I thought about tossing a can of San Marzano tomatoes into the food processer, but I didn’t feel like doing that and thought it might take away from the pasta flavor. I ended up making a lemon and white wine garlic sauce. I didn’t follow a recipe for that – I melted some butter with olive oil, put in 2 cloves of minced garlic, a little bit of parmesan, and added a splash of white wine and  lemon juice. Then, seasoned with salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes (which were homemade and given to us by Jake’s coworker). I only made a small amount because I didn’t want to overpower the pasta.

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I happened to have a chicken breast in the freezer, which I thawed out earlier that day. I cut it into chunks and air fried them to toss with the pasta. I also cut up the last tomato for some freshness in the pasta, as well.

As a side note, we had ears of corn that we bought last weekend and wanted to use those up, so I made a semi-Mexican street corn. I say “semi” because I didn’t have all of the right ingredients, but used what we did have. If you’re interested, here’s a recipe that I’ve used in the past that came out well.

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The end result was a really good pasta dish. I have to say, though, that the pasta didn’t carry much of the flavors. I think if I had used a different type of tomato that packed more flavor, like Roma tomatoes, and fresh basil, I might have had a different result. Either way, pasta is pasta and we enjoyed it!

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Good luck!

Sincerely,
Fu’d

Lazy Eggplant Parmesan

I am a savory foods lover. Yes, my statement is very definitive. Put a cake and lasagna in front of me and lasagna gets the “W” every time. And although the end of this summer has been unseasonably hot, I still have fall peaking into my mind. Those two reasons together make for the perfect excuse to start cooking up warm and hearty dishes.

This post is about a lazy weeknight eggplant parmesan dinner. What makes this dish lazy/genius is that the eggplant does NOT have to be breaded and pan fried like it does in most other recipes. It saves infinite amounts of time and effort. And guess what – the difference at the end for an average person like me is practically undetectable. Plus, load it up if you want more substance/flavor or load it down if you want something lighter and healthier.

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I originally found a similar recipe years ago that was meant for the slow cooker. (Unfortunately, I don’t have that recipe, but I found a simple one if you’d like to try it. Click here for the Crock Pot Eggplant Parmesan recipe.)

What I did is simple. I don’t specify exact amounts here because I eye-balled it and used ingredients I had laying around the house. And like I mentioned before, load it up or load it down – use the ingredients to your taste.

Ingredients

  • Eggplant
  • Tomato Sauce
  • Garden Tomatoes
  • Mozzarella Cheese
  • Italian Style Bread Crumbs
  • Olive Oil
  • Dried Seasonings – Basil; Oregano; Salt; Pepper

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Directions (Summary)

  1. Slice an eggplant, season the slices, and pre-cook (if desired)
  2. Layer tomato sauce at the bottom of the baking dish
  3. Add the following layers in this order:
    • Pre-cooked eggplant slices
    • Breadcrumbs
    • Freshly sliced tomatoes
    • Tomato sauce
    • Dried seasonings (to taste)
    • Mozarrella cheese
  4. Repeat steps 3 – 8 at least one more time

Directions (Comments & Photos)

Slice an eggplant, season, and pre-cook

I used one medium-sized eggplant, sliced. I sprayed the slices with a little olive oil and seasoned with salt and pepper. I then popped them into my air fryer for a bit to soften them up. I only did this because I wanted to reduce my overall baking time later. Use more eggplant if you want to create more layers.

If you don’t have an air fryer, consider getting one! I’m a bit biased, as I love mine. (You can read about it here: My Air Fryer: Convection Perfection.) Otherwise, go ahead and bake the slices for a little bit in the oven. If you want to skip the pre-cooking all together, try slicing the eggplant thinner and bake the assembled product a little longer.

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Layer some tomato sauce

I blended some canned San Marzano tomatoes last week to make a margherita pizza and  froze a cup of the leftovers. I defrosted it to use as the sauce in this dish. I recommend you use more sauce than I did. Canned pasta sauce or jarred sauce would work just fine.

I used a 9″ x 13″ glass baking dish. Spray your baking dish first and then layer a little bit of the sauce at the bottom. This probably isn’t necessary, but I always like to put a little coating first.

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Add the rest of the layers and repeat

The rest of the steps from here on are easy peasy.

Layer the pre-cooked eggplant slices so the bottom of the dish is covered. Some overlap  of the slices is OK.

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Then, sprinkle some breadcrumbs. Use as much as you like, but I recommend enough to just barely cover the eggplant slices. I went light on the breacrumbs, as you can see from the photo. Use a little more for more flavor.

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Place some tomato slices over the top. This is a completely optional step. Most eggplant parm recipes don’t use tomato slices like this, but I was given some fresh garden tomatoes. Not only did I think it was a good opportunity to use them up, but I also wanted to counteract the fact that I didn’t have a lot of tomato sauce.

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Pour some of the tomato sauce, making sure to cover any of the areas or cracks that the tomato slices don’t cover. Sprinkle some of the dried seasonings over the tomatoes and sauce. If you have fresh basil, use it! I didn’t have any on hand, so I just used what I have in the spice cabinet.

Spread some mozzarella cheese. I recommend using shredded mozzarella so you can get more even distribution. I had pre-sliced mozzarella in the fridge from last weekend’s pizza, so I tore pieces and evenly distributed. This inadvertently helped me keep the dish light because I didn’t have copious amounts of cheese to saturate throughout.

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Lastly, repeat all those layers at least one more time. If you have more ingredients or want to make it thicker, repeat a third time. Note: I have extra seasonings at the very top because I actually forgot to add seasonings on my second sauce layer and decided to add them after the fact. (See? That’s how flexible this recipe is!)

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I covered my dish with tin foil and baked at 375 degrees for about 30 minutes. I took the foil off and increased the temperature to 425 degrees so that I could get some of the golden brown color on the cheese. This will probably take 5-8 minutes or so, but keep an eye on it. You can even choose to broil at the end instead.

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The photo (below) of the eggplant served in the dish is actually 2 servings piled on top of each other. Since my assembled eggplant parm was 2 layers high, the total served portion is 4 layers.

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We had leftovers with just the two of us, so I actually used them for dinner tonight. I paired it with the leftover quinoa salad from Labor Day, and served some air-fried kale on the side. Can’t forget that drizzle of sriracha. Mmm. My favorite!

Good luck!

Sincerely,
Fu’d

Labor Day Meat Sweats

One Last Cookout –

Happy Labor Day! This holiday in the U.S. is often seen as the last weekend of summer – people begin to close their pools for the season, kids get ready to go back to school, and families and friends have one last big cookout. One of Jake’s many hobbies is smoking meat. For this Labor Day weekend, he decided to cook up some of his ol’ faithful recipes and try some new ones. He made a smoked haddock dip, smoked ribs, and a smoked beef chuck.

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See? Even the pups couldn’t resist waiting by the smoker for the scrumptious food!


Smoked Haddock Dip

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Easter 2017 – Jake’s Smoked Salmon (right)

Last Easter, Jake had tried his very first smoked fish (salmon). We had his family over that day and we conducted our own little research test. We put out store-bought cold-smoked salmon and Jake’s smoked salmon. Jake’s salmon won by a landslide.

Last weekend, Jake had ventured out on a day of fishing with his friend. He came back with a few pounds of fresh haddock. Here was the perfect opportunity to make another smoked fish. He let the haddock fillets sit in a homemade brine overnight. The brine was seasoned as if he were going to use it for a baked haddock (sans the Ritz cracker).

Next day, he smoked the fish for a few hours, regularly basting it with butter and lemon. After a taste test, Jake decided last minute to make a smoked haddock dip. The dip ingredients included cream cheese, sour cream, cayenne, pepper, and green onion. It was absolutely delicious and balanced the perfect amount of smokiness with that classic creamy dip taste.


Smoked Ribs

Jake has made smoked ribs a handful of times now. This time, he decided on two different batches:

  1. A homemade Memphis dry rub
  2. Aloha Spice Company’s Organic Aloha Chicken & Pork rub

There are a couple schools of thought on how ribs should be. Some love it fall-off-the-bone and others (Jake) like it with a little resistance and structure. As for me? As long as it’s good, I’ll eat it! Close to when the ribs are done, Jake likes to brush a bit of BBQ sauce on top. These were great and I can definitely tell he’s begun to perfect his rib smoking! Tangy outside with a little bit of that crust; tender on the inside.

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Smoked Beef Chuck

We stopped by BJ’s Wholesale Club on the way home the other day and picked up a 3 lb beef chuck. We really like the meat they have there and they were nice enough to cut us the size chuck we wanted. In fact, we had gotten the ribs there, as well. The beef chuck was simply seasoned with salt, pepper, brown sugar, and a basting mixture to keep the chuck moist while cooking. Jake has an extra secret technique with his chucks that he won’t allow me to disclose! I’ll try to sneak it into one of my future posts. 😉

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20180902_165806The chuck is one of my favorite thing that Jake smokes. (My absolute favorite is his smoked citrus turkey breast.) Look at those smoke rings on the slices. So good!


We invited our friends, Rob and Lindsay, over to enjoy the meal with us. We whipped up a couple of sides, including a quinoa salad and pasta salad. Lindsay brought homemade lavender lemon squares and her fail-safe brownies for dessert.

(Side note – Every once in a while, Lindsay and I plan out full cooking days where we try out a bunch of new recipes. I can’t wait until our next one so I can post the mouth-watering photos.)

We ended the night with some drinks and conversation around the fire pit. It was a wonderful day and I hope you enjoy your weekend, as well.

Sincerely,
Fu’d

My Air Fryer: Convection Perfection

As Seen On TV –

A few months ago, I decided to purchase an air fryer. Up until then, it was only one of those “as seen on TV” gags. I was sure no one had any use for it in real life. However, my husband, Jake, and I really wanted to start eating healthier. We tried all sorts of things. We counted calories, did intermittent fasting, cut down on meat, etc.

The air fryer was another one of those “things” on the list. It started to look appealing because advertisements showed fried foods that didn’t require the typical unhealthy amounts of oil and fat. As it crossed my mind with increased frequency, I started to notice the weekly Bed Bath & Beyond coupons I usually ignore in my e-mail. Out of curiosity, I clicked on the link and searched for air fryers. I found one that had a decent number of positive reviews. Plus, I could use the extra 20% off coupon. I decided to go for it. I didn’t know if it was something I was going to like or use a lot, so I didn’t want to invest a lot of money. I ended up paying $76.49 for the Gourmia® Fryista 5-Quart Air Fryer in Black/Stainless Steel from Bed Bath & Beyond. I think this model may be a bit older and not sold anymore.

A breakdown of my costs:

Air Fryer……..$71.99 (after 20% coupon)
Shipping………..Free
Sales Tax………$4.50
TOTAL………..$76.49

 

 


What To Cook?

This is the best purchase I have made in a long time. I use my air fryer as often as possible (sometimes every night of the week). Now I wish that I had bought a nicer one with a digital display! I seldom use it to actually fry foods. I use it more so as an easy way to bake, sautée, and pan fry. Here are just a few of the foods we have cooked so far in our air fryer. The photos below include chicken wings, mini frittata cups, bacon, french fries, coconut shrimp, fried rice, tofu, and sweet peppers.

(By the way, bacon coming out of the air fryer tastes so much better than when it sits in its own grease on the stove. It is also much easier than trying to balance a baking sheet full of grease while taking it out of the oven.)

 

 

We’ve also tried jalapeño poppers, steak, bacon mac and cheese balls, and bacon wrapped scallops. Some other foods that I cook in the air fryer regularly are fish, kale, green beans, mushrooms, onions, and chicken. In fact, below is a simple weeknight dish I made. It has sweet peppers and onions cooked in the air fryer, as well as haddock with blackening seasoning cooked in the air fryer.

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Next on the list will be to try cookies, cakes, and breads!


Regrets Are For People Without an Air Fryer

Following Recipes

You’ll find a lot of air fryer recipes out there, but my advice is not to follow those. The air fryer is easy to set in terms of time and temperature, but I often just pull the basket out, shake the food around, and use my own judgment on if it’s done or not. I also find that I can cook most foods on the highest temperature (400°F). I convinced my parents to purchase an air fryer and they’ve had trouble getting foods to turn out right because they’re too reliant on following recipes to a T.

Less Dishes, More Relaxation

Overall, I end up needing to wash less dishes – YES!! Here’s how:

  • The grated basket comes right out of the base part and can double as a colander.
  • The air fryer is not always completely an oil-free endeavor, but most of the time I can get away with spray oil on the food when it’s already in the basket. This means no separate mixing bowl or utensils to cover the food with oil.
  • I’ll generally use the air fryer to cook multiple parts of a meal on a given night, so I don’t end up with multiple dirty pots and pans.

For The Love of Copper

We are a huge fan of copper. We have copper pots, pans, and baking sheets. Needless to say, the copper in our air fryer works well for us and is easy to clean.

If in another few months we continue to use the air fryer frequently, perhaps we’ll consider an upgrade and/or purchasing some accessories. I would love to get pan inserts or racks for double-layer cooking.


Hopefully this got you thinking about air fryers. Good luck with any purchases you make!

Sincerely,
Fu’d